Water News


California Urban Water Conservation Council is Now The California Water Efficiency Partnership

Wednesday, March 08, 2017
We are pleased to announce that the California Urban Water Conservation Council is now the California Water Efficiency Partnership.
 
The new name communicates a vision for an innovative organization that provides leadership on water efficiency issues in California, and also conveys the spirit of inclusion and collaboration among a wide variety of stakeholders envisioned by the Board and members.
 
California Water Efficiency Partnership was selected after a comprehensive process that included members submitting more than 50 name suggestions for consideration by the Board, research with water industry stakeholders, and a survey of members for their preferred name.
 
Thank you to everyone who participated in the name selection process. We look forward to working with you as we continue this organizational transformation. Next up: the development of a new logo.

We need fairer water conservation goals for inland California

Tuesday, December 15, 2015
The State Water Resources Control Board meets Monday on potential changes to mandatory water conservation targets should the drought persist into 2016. It needs to correct a significant problem with current targets that unfairly impact California’s inland communities. Read the full story here.

A Sign Saying Back Off My (Green) Lawn

Tuesday, December 15, 2015
In Northern California, curious signs of the drought are popping up at homes with lush lawns.

They read: “Our gardens are watered by a well,” or, “non-potable water in use for irrigation.”
What they’re really saying is, don’t be mad at me because of my green lawn.
Read the full story here.


Could Los Angeles design its way to water independence?

Monday, December 14, 2015
The San Fernando Valley is a sprawling concrete metropolis of stucco-encrusted- apartment buildings and chain stores — a sun-baked suburb with freeways “running through the yard,” as songwriter Tom Petty aptly put it.

To Peter Arnold, an architect in Los Angeles, the maze of cul-de-sacs and identical houses represents a failure of vision: a city that relies on a water system that is invisible, and therefore undervalued. “You just turn on a tap,” he says, “and there it is.”

Him and his wife are trying to re-invent the way cities such as LA use its water.
Read the full story here.


L.A.'s turf rebates aren't just a gimmick

Monday, December 14, 2015

When more than 9,000 households and businesses rip out their thirsty lawns and replace them with drought-tolerant landscaping that requires a fraction of the water over the long run, that's no gimmick. That's real, permanent transformation that will help Los Angeles conserve water for years to come.
Read the full story here.

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